Parents are inspiring their kids to learn financial literacy with a simple message: save for college! It’s a worthwhile goal helping to build healthy financial habits for life and also to reduce the need for student loans in the future. Here are some ways that parents can help their children get on the right track early and stay the course.

  • Learn by doing: The number one way for students to begin saving early for college is to actually do it. The very act of taking money and putting it into a specific account for college savings is instrumental, not just for growing education funds but also learning a healthy financial habit for life. For early savers, it’s simply a matter of motivation.
  • Encourage financial literacy: Embrace financial literacy and learn about money: how to save it, how to spend it, and how to make it work for you. Even with digital money and payment platforms becoming more common, parents can begin to encourage their children to understand financial literacy by explaining about the different coins and dollar bills, and help them put money into a piggy bank or a savings account. As they mature, you might begin talking to older children about investments and different kinds of savings. The key is to have open conversation about personal finance, so that kids learn early that money is something to be managed properly. If that didn’t happen for you, it’s never too late to learn.
  • Learn to budget: This is a great exercise for students and parents. Take a week or two to record all of your purchases and see how much you spend. Record all of your income. Categorize your expenses and determine how much of your income can go into savings. Though “expenses” may be limited, kids should get into the habit of doing this so they can manage a personal budget as they mature. The 50/30/20 method of budgeting suggests breaking things into percentages in the categories of fixed costs, financial goals and flexible spending, but there are many ways to do this.
  • Put a percentage of gifts away: Gifts from birthdays and other holidays are great opportunities to boost college savings accounts. The trick is allocating it to savings before it is spent! Put a percentage of each gift into that account and watch the money grow. One of the most fundamental aspects of starting early is that thanks to interest, your money will be worth more years down the line when you need it.
  • Getting a job: The best way to increase income is to make money on a regular basis through work. A student’s first priority, especially in high school, needs to be their education, but flexible jobs give you the opportunity to earn money of your own. Babysitting is a great job for high schoolers, because it’s flexible and families often need babysitters on the weekends. When the kids go to bed, you often can do homework, accomplishing two things in one go. Other jobs that have weekend shifts include being a cashier at a grocery store or convenience store, working in a bakery, working as a golf caddy, or serving in a restaurant. Students with an entrepreneurial streak might start their own dog walking business or make things to sell.
  • Be consistent: Having a good plan in place is important, but what’s more important is putting that plan into action. If you plan to save $100 a month, continue to do that. It’s important to stick with it until it becomes second nature. You’ll be grateful that you did when you approach college and have a sizable savings account to help pay for it.
  • Parents and children work together: Financial literacy brings families together with a shared goal of greater prosperity. Parents can help set up the paperwork for a college savings plan while their children follow through with their consistent plan to earn and save money.  
  • Keep parents or grandparents as 529 account holders: Make sure to maximize savings in relation to potential financial aid eligibility by making the parent (or even grandparent) the account holder of 529 savings. It turns out that savings in a student’s name can reduce financial aid eligibility, by increasing the family’s “Expected Family Contribution” Money in a child’s name (like in checking/savings accounts) is counted as a student asset on the FAFSA, with as much as 20% of it’s value weighed against financial aid eligibility. This presents an unfortunate situation when it comes to college savings and financial literacy; you want your child to learn about saving money, but you also want to get the best value for college savings. There are significant benefits to keeping the majority of college savings in the parent’s name. A 529 in the parent’s name counts as a parent asset, and is assesses 5.6% of its value against FAFSA eligibility, a lower rate than a student asset. This comes into play during the need analysis process, which shelters parents’ assets more than it does those of their children. There are a number of strategies that you can use to maximize your aid eligibility. For students who are saving for college, it could be helpful to have them save the money but put it into this account under the parent’s name. That way, you are maximizing the potential for aid.

The idea of getting students to start saving for college early isn’t just about growing their contribution to their education savings, though that’s important. It’s also about children learning to manage their money and starting off strong so that they can grow up to be independent adults. It’s important because having them pay for a portion of their college costs gives them more ownership over the process because they’re investing their own money. Financial literacy is a skill for life; by starting young, children are are set up for financial success early.

 

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