Join America Saves Week! “Save with a Plan…For Education” beginning 2/26/18

Save the date for America Saves week! Beginning Monday February 26, 2018

Invite Education is coordinating activities with America Saves Week 2018 (#ASW18) to highlight the importance of saving for education. Each year America Saves week sponsors a week long focus on various elements of saving – attracting 30+ million individuals.   #ASW18 will be the first year that saving for education will be emphasized.

Participant (“Education Savings Supporter”) Requirements: Invite Education seeks Education Savings Supporters to participate in the activities planned for the first day of America Saves Week 2018, February 26th, “Save with a Plan … For Education.”

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There is no cost to participate. The only commitment is to support at least one of the planned activities.

Messaging Themes: The goal is to establish a nationwide campaign of common messaging to promote the idea that saving for education is important. Program participants will use common “Got Milk” type, generic messaging in a variety of forums on February 26, 2018. Messages, which will be supported with infographics and data, would include, but not be limited to:

  • “Saving a Dollar Today is Better than Borrowing One Tomorrow”
  • “It’s Never too Early or Too Late to Start Saving for Education”
  • “Start Saving for Education Today. Today, Not Tomorrow”
  • “Saving Small Amounts is Better than Not Saving At All”
  • “Starting to Save Early Gives Your Nest Egg A Chance to Grow Bigger”

Activities: Invite Education will coordinate (schedule social/traditional media) and support (provide talking points, draft articles,) a series of nation-wide activities supplemented by regional/local events sponsored by Education Savings Supporters. Education Savings Supporters are encouraged to plan and host their own activities as well.

How do we save for college graphic

Currently, Invite Education is soliciting ideas for activities and is considering the following:

  • Social Media Activities
    • Targeted Twitter Messages of the Messaging Themes
    • Twitter Chats – perhaps several on focused sub-topics
      • Saving for College
      • Saving in the Underserved Community
    • Facebook Live Event
    • Coordinated Podcast Releases
    • Coordinated Blog Posts
    • LinkedIn Posts
  • Traditional Media Events
    • Radio Interviews
      • National/Syndicates
      • Local Market
    • Print
      • Op-Ed Pieces
      • Articles
      • Interviews
    • Television

Education Savings Supporters: (* = confirmed participant)

  • American Student Assistance
  • College Savings Foundation
  • College Savings Plan Network
  • Consumer Bankers Association
  • Cooperative Credit Union Association
  • Council for Economic Education
    • National
    • Massachusetts
  • Education Finance Council
  • Finance Authority of Maine
  • Inversant
  • Jump$tart
    • National
    • Maine
    • Massachusetts
    • Rhode Island
  • LendKey Technologies
  • Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority
  • Mayor’s Office
    • City of Boston
  • National Treasurer’s Association
  • NHHEAF
  • Rhode Island Student Loan Authority
  • Sallie Mae
  • Strada Education
  • Treasurer’s Office:
    • Massachusetts
    • Rhode Island
  • S. News and World Report

Thank you for considering how you might help spread the message that saving for education is important.

Invite Education Contacts:

#ASW18 Event Co-ordinator: Ken O’Connor – ken@inviteeducation.com

#ASW18 Content Co-ordinator: Michael Esposito – Mike@Inviteeducation.com

#ASW18 Contributor: Hailee O’Keefe-MacDonald – Hailee@Inviteeducation.com

 

Franklin First Federal Credit Union launches college planning center with Invite Education

Press release from CUInsight:

GREENFIELD, MA (July 19, 2017) — Franklin First Federal Credit Union (FFFCU) has announced a partnership with Invite Education to offer a free comprehensive, life-cycle college planning website. FFFCU’s College Planning Center, powered by Invite Education, is available to anyone, FFFCU members or non-members, who would like better information, tools, and services to more effectively plan and pay for college. FFFCU is the first Credit Union to partner with Invite Education.

“Planning and paying for higher education can be a daunting task for families. Our hope in partnering with Invite Education is to make this process less stressful by helping families answer critical questions such as ‘How do I save for my children’s education?’ ‘Can my child get in to their dream school?’ and ‘Can we afford it?’” said Franklin First CEO/President Michelle Dwyer. “We look forward to helping all families in the community make the college planning process more positive and rewarding with our new College Planning Center.”

Jeff Bentley, Director of Strategic Partnerships for Invite Education added: “Invite Education is thrilled to have a strategic partner such as Franklin First, which is a visionary thought leader in offering a College Planning Center to clarify the college process for its members.”

The FFFCU/Invite Education College Planning Center is a robust platform with an intuitive design that empowers families to manage the entire college planning process from birth through high school. The website offers:

  • Age-appropriate guidance to empower families with detailed information on preparing, financing, and successfully applying to college
  • Easy-to-understand explanations to help parents evaluate options: savings, scholarships, financial aid, and loans
  • Comprehensive calculators and college and scholarship search engines
  • Resource Center with college planning resources and FFFCU endorsed products/services
  • Calendar that integrates relevant testing dates, college and scholarship deadlines, and family specific events

Those interested can access the FFFCU College Planning Center at https://franklinfirst.inviteeducation.com/. For more information, call Franklin First Federal Credit Union at (413) 774-6700.


About Franklin First Federal Credit Union

Franklin First Federal Credit Union began in 1958 at Franklin County Public Hospital. In the 1980’s there were mergers of four Franklin County credit unions: Franklin County Public Hospital FCU, Franklin County Teachers FCU, Lunt Silversmiths CU, and Greenfield Tap & Die Credit Union. Anyone who lives, works, attends school or worships in Franklin County can join Franklin First. They currently serve over 7,000 members and over 250 Business Group Partners at their branch at 57 Newton Street in Greenfield, Massachusetts.

About Invite Education

Founded in 2012, Invite Education demystifies the process of planning and paying for college by providing a comprehensive suite of information, tools and services for families. Offering an online custom College Planning Center, a weekly podcast called My College Corner, a blog and a book, they partner with organizations to provide this valuable information to their employees, members and customers.

Contacts

Michelle Dwyer
Franklin First Federal Credit Union
(413) 774-6700

Alleviating the Stresses of an Expensive College Tuition

By: Claire Bendig, Recent Graduate of Chapman University

Tuition loans can be a cause of student stress, especially with enough interest accrued to require repayment well into the future. Difficult to evade, only determined hard work will eventually pay them off.

As a college graduate myself, we enter a world of endless responsibilities, unsure of what to do. The debt that is carried over from an undergraduate degree is astronomical. education-2385117_1920According to Student Loan Hero, a blog that guides indebted students, “Americans owe nearly $1.3 trillion in student loan debt, spread out among about 44 million borrowers. In fact, the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.”

There are ways to alleviate the stresses of an expensive tuition. FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid, is a government form that qualifies students for aid based on their particular financial situation.  The problem for many is the tedious application process. It has more than 100 questions, including inquiries about parents’ assets, taxes and net worth.

In March 2016, a group of seven students went to Washington, D.C., to help pass a bill to streamline the FAFSA process. Patrick McDermott was among those who attended. As a student working with college freshmen in dealing with these issues, he says, “The FAFSA process could be made a lot easier by not only implementing the IRS direct transfer as is done now, but by streamlining the amount of information required in determining the monetary awards.” (The IRS Data Retrieval Tool has since faced security issues, causing it to be shut down for now)

Even though the application can be overwhelming for students to fill out, it is well worth the effort to gain access to guaranteed school funding.

Credit unions can help students with financial debt as well (along with other perks like reduced transaction fees, online banking, debit and low-interest rate credit cards). Organizations such as Credit Union Student Choice lay out credit union options for students and mentor them on how loans work and ways to evade interest penalties. When joining a credit union, if the student has a co-signer, they can get a lower interest rate.

In line with their mission to help others, credit union loans will often allow the co-signer to be without obligations if the student has been consistent with payments for the past 12 months. Toni Jaroszewicz, Detroit Branch Manager of Lake Trust Credit Union says, “We offer credit counseling and work with our young folks to help get them on the right track to pay down debt and implement plans that will lead them to financial success.”

Counseling is the educational foundation that is needed to better understand the expectations of the college graduate, and because of the member-status of account holders, credit unions are willing to provide more financial guidance than they are likely to find at banks. My peers and I have graduation fears because so much is unknown. By expanding practical education, we can enter the professional world more confident in our abilities to succeed.

Claire Bendig is a contributor to the Millennial Voice column for CO-OP Financial Services, a financial technology company for 3,500 credit unions and their 60 million members. She is a recent graduate of Chapman University in Orange, California, with an Emphasis in Creative and Technical Writing.

Student Loan miniseries just in time for for your college plans: #MyCollegeCorner

Students and parents are already gearing up for college payment decisions, so we put together a student loan miniseries on our Youtube Channel to help get the knowledge out there. #MyCollegeCorner features weekly updates, so subscribe to stay on track with your plan.  Today’s episode covers subsidized and unsubsidized loans.  Stay tuned for insight on Parent Plus in upcoming episodes.

Gen Z wants to Save $: Lessons from #AmericaSavesWeek

Times are changing! It was an exciting #AmericaSavesWeek Feb 27-March 4 and much was learned. Check your socials for #ASW17 or #ASW2017 for loads of financial wisdom and motivation from a variety of institutions. If you ever wonder if it’s making an impact, remember a new generation “Gen-Z” grew up in the “Financial Crises” era with a different view  of money not seen since the Great Depression, so get ready to roll out even more financial literacy content to support their goals and share prosperity!

A study from the Gild featured on Marcomm.com explains:

“Yet Gen Z were shown to be a generation of savers having grown up post-financial crash, with 25% saying they would rather save for the future than spend money they don’t have and 22% saying they never spend on “unnecessary, frivolous things” because saving is so important. These attitudes were shared with the Silent Generation, with 43% and 25% of respectively.”

The study also notes that this is a generation that grew up with the internet and is accustomed to information being made available quickly on any modern device. It’s a long way from the dial-up modem days!

Feel old yet? THINK AGAIN! Traditional institutions like banks, credit unions, educational non-profits and 529 providers are in position to grow using a combination of new technology and time tested wisdom already present in your culture.  Technology is more socialized with Gen Z to where expectations for simple online tools has grown. They have goals and want to move forward. Will your organization help or hinder this process? Here’s a few ideas:

What is your narrative? Even if you think your organization doesn’t have one, or maybe it’s to “maximize shareholder value” (No small feat), your group’s goals are a piece of the greater story Gen-Z is living through.  Are you helping them get where they want to be? If the answer is a resounding “YES” then stick to it and continue to empower Gen-Z with your traditions adapted up to new technology.  Yes, you can promote financial literacy to a new generation of savvy savers and they want to engage your organization to do so!

Your content can provide both sides of the story: Let’s face it, it’s a noisy environment on social media. There appears to be a storm in every news cycle, and the cycles are happening faster than ever!   The good news is your organization does not need to pick sides on hot media topics (Education, Healthcare, Government are astoundingly media driven at times), it just needs to know both sides of the story.  If you are sticking with a principled narrative, you help people guide themselves through any situation using your concepts and ideas. Gen Z is very aware that a single story may be interpreted in many different ways, so instead of pushing an agenda, keep it simple and show both sides of the story while promoting honest dialogue.  Keep your comments section open to allow different views to participate and communicate perspective on your content.

Help with decision making first: There’s a lot of options! We’ve learned this first hand at Invite Education with software covering the financial variables related to college attendance. With over 4,000 institutions of higher learning plus a huge scholarship database, the best thing we can do is provide transparency and financial literacy fundamentals to help families make smart decisions.  We realize there is no perfect “one way” for everyone, so we take a “Consumer Reports” approach to the question of college choice.  This way anyone can use the resources and find what they need.  Just let people make their own personal decisions with your organization’s assistance.  This is far removed from the days of pushing product first on radio or tv.  It’s about targeting the goals of your audience first and providing value with products/services supporting those goals featured second.  Gen-Z is ready to move their life forward, are you ready to help?

Learn more about Invite Education; Subscribe to the Youtube Page for great interviews, college planning advice and more.

Check out Invite Education #MyCollegeCorner on YouTube

Making sense of complex college funding questions just got easier!

Check out the Invite Education YouTube channel for #MyCollegeCorner videos featuring answers to your most common questions, and insight on how best to proceed.

The Free Money Mini-Series begins this week bringing light to the subject of grants and scholarships, your favorite money from the financial aid office since it does not need to be paid back like a loan.   Like, Share and Subscribe!

 

Highlights from the RI Jump$tart Financial Capability Conference: #FinLitRI on Twitter

Highlights from theRI Jump$tart Financial Capability Conference!

Financial literacy is modernizing with new tools to deliver empowering knowledge helping people make smart financial decisions. It’s grown to include   and  and more as featured throughout the conference. Invite Education supports these initiatives, with Jeff Bentley in attendance, providing copies of the new book “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”:

 

The Harvard Coop features “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”

12/6/16 UPDATE**

Thanks so much to the Harvard Coop for hosting the event!

 

 

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Join authors John Hupalo and Peter Mazareas at the Harvard Coop for discussion and signing of the new book “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”, available now.

Topics include:

  • Grade and age appropriate guidance for parents with newborns through 12th grade Admissions and financial aid tips
  • Learning about 529 plans for college savings
  • Important deadlines that can’t be missed
  • Audience questions on planning and paying for college

Date: Tuesday December 6, 2016 @ 7:00 pm

Location: Harvard Coop. 1400 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge, MA 02238

Contact: 617-499-2000 www.thecoop.com

Paying for college with early admissions

Have you looked into getting admitted to a preferred school much earlier than standard admissions deadlines?  Then you’re probably considering an “early decision” or “early action” where the student chooses to attend a specific college much earlier than standard admissions deadlines.

early-bird
Early Bird admissions and financial aid

Know the difference: Early decision (ED) refers to a binding decision to attend a specific school.  Students taking early decision commit to one specific school as early as the fall semester of senior year, foregoing admission to any other institution.  Early Action (EA) is a non-binding admissions process where students are notified very early of their acceptance but may choose to attend a different school.

Early decision: How’s it paid for? Going forward with an early decision requires organization and a clear path to covering the balance.  Traditionally, the biggest challenge associated with early decision was affordability, since the choice was made without comparing actual financial aid offers from other schools.  Gaining early admission with the means to pay the bill outright regardless of financial aid and scholarships works for some, but not all families. If the financial aid offered with an early decision application is too low, families have the option to appeal the decision and ultimately reject if proven unaffordable.  Going through early decision only to end up not attending is an avoidable stress through realistic college planning, so unless the school is an absolute “must attend” situation, it may not be worth applying this way.  It’s expected that students only submit one early decision application to one school, but may also submit standard applications to other schools by agreeing to withdraw those applications if accepted for the early decision school.  There is a wide gap from early admissions beginning in November to when standard admissions deposits are due in May, so be aware of deadlines to know when a final decision is required.

Early action: What are my options? Early action admissions allow students the benefit of immediately applying to several schools instead of just one.  This allows for families to compare financial aid offers without being bound to just one institution. Early action has become much more common to help students zero in on their final college choice after recognizing all their best options. Early action does require a pro-active approach to make sure each school has all admissions and financial aid information available allowing for clear comparisons between offers.

Financial aid applications are early too: The FAFSA (and CSS Profile) has been available since October 1, 2016 for college students beginning their freshman year in Fall 2017.  This is 3 months earlier than the traditional January 1st FAFSA date, allowing more time for schools to begin sorting through many financial aid requests and early admission applications.  Since this is the first time FAFSA is being made available so early, most schools are still following  regular deadlines like in March, April and May.  But for families handling early admissions, this earlier date hopefully provides more breathing room to compare options.

Merit based vs need based funding: Remember the differences between college funding. Grants are need based financial aid awards provided by federal, state and school programs considering  income and asset information on the FAFSA and/or CSS Profile.  Merit based scholarships are awarded to students considering high test scores, grades, sports, community service and other student qualities and achievements.  When making a final choice about early admissions, make sure the financial aid award letter accounts for both need based and merit based funding eligibility.  You want a complete financial picture when comparing school options, which is why all your financial aid documentation needs to be filed as early as possible.

 

What to look for on a college visit

Visiting colleges is fun, but with all the excitement, it’s easy to miss some important lasting details that can make (or break) a campus experience.

Know the costs before you go: Make comparing campuses easy by knowing the tuition, room, board and expenses before the visit. This way you can enjoy the experience while being practical about the value provided and how it can be paid for.

Try the food: Meal plans have a variety of options to match student needs and schedule.  Stop by the cafeteria or other food vendors on campus to look for….

  • Quality: Is the food worth the cost of the meal plan?  Is there enough fresh food available to keep students healthy and energized?
  • Access: Where is the cafeteria and what’s the time schedule?  Are there multiple food locations open at different hours serving different food?

Talk to the students:  Ask about their experience and why they chose the school.  What do they like best, or are there some things they want to see improved?  Hearing it directly from current students can provide great insight to make a decision.

What’s the campus like? A campus can change rapidly depending on the day of the week. Big events and sports will take over space, especially during football season.  Other schools may be very busy during the week and very quiet on weekends.  Compare schools considering their percentage of resident and commuter students to recognize differences in campus life.

Class drop-ins: If possible, stop into a class room to listen and learn.  Be on the look out for teachers in majors you are interested in.  Ask questions about their respective programs and gauge your own interest in pursuing more knowledge.  How would you handle class in this environment?

Facilities: A campus is made up of many buildings and locations. Gyms, class rooms, labs and parking are just some of the things in plain view, but while on tour look for details like how spacious or crowded it was and the ability to navigate between buildings.  Ideally, you are looking for very safe, clean and well managed locations.  Most importantly, how’s the internet connection?