Join America Saves Week! “Save with a Plan…For Education” beginning 2/26/18

Save the date for America Saves week! Beginning Monday February 26, 2018

Invite Education is coordinating activities with America Saves Week 2018 (#ASW18) to highlight the importance of saving for education. Each year America Saves week sponsors a week long focus on various elements of saving – attracting 30+ million individuals.   #ASW18 will be the first year that saving for education will be emphasized.

Participant (“Education Savings Supporter”) Requirements: Invite Education seeks Education Savings Supporters to participate in the activities planned for the first day of America Saves Week 2018, February 26th, “Save with a Plan … For Education.”

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There is no cost to participate. The only commitment is to support at least one of the planned activities.

Messaging Themes: The goal is to establish a nationwide campaign of common messaging to promote the idea that saving for education is important. Program participants will use common “Got Milk” type, generic messaging in a variety of forums on February 26, 2018. Messages, which will be supported with infographics and data, would include, but not be limited to:

  • “Saving a Dollar Today is Better than Borrowing One Tomorrow”
  • “It’s Never too Early or Too Late to Start Saving for Education”
  • “Start Saving for Education Today. Today, Not Tomorrow”
  • “Saving Small Amounts is Better than Not Saving At All”
  • “Starting to Save Early Gives Your Nest Egg A Chance to Grow Bigger”

Activities: Invite Education will coordinate (schedule social/traditional media) and support (provide talking points, draft articles,) a series of nation-wide activities supplemented by regional/local events sponsored by Education Savings Supporters. Education Savings Supporters are encouraged to plan and host their own activities as well.

How do we save for college graphic

Currently, Invite Education is soliciting ideas for activities and is considering the following:

  • Social Media Activities
    • Targeted Twitter Messages of the Messaging Themes
    • Twitter Chats – perhaps several on focused sub-topics
      • Saving for College
      • Saving in the Underserved Community
    • Facebook Live Event
    • Coordinated Podcast Releases
    • Coordinated Blog Posts
    • LinkedIn Posts
  • Traditional Media Events
    • Radio Interviews
      • National/Syndicates
      • Local Market
    • Print
      • Op-Ed Pieces
      • Articles
      • Interviews
    • Television

Education Savings Supporters: (* = confirmed participant)

  • American Student Assistance
  • College Savings Foundation
  • College Savings Plan Network
  • Consumer Bankers Association
  • Cooperative Credit Union Association
  • Council for Economic Education
    • National
    • Massachusetts
  • Education Finance Council
  • Finance Authority of Maine
  • Inversant
  • Jump$tart
    • National
    • Maine
    • Massachusetts
    • Rhode Island
  • LendKey Technologies
  • Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority
  • Mayor’s Office
    • City of Boston
  • National Treasurer’s Association
  • NHHEAF
  • Rhode Island Student Loan Authority
  • Sallie Mae
  • Strada Education
  • Treasurer’s Office:
    • Massachusetts
    • Rhode Island
  • S. News and World Report

Thank you for considering how you might help spread the message that saving for education is important.

Invite Education Contacts:

#ASW18 Event Co-ordinator: Ken O’Connor – ken@inviteeducation.com

#ASW18 Content Co-ordinator: Michael Esposito – Mike@Inviteeducation.com

#ASW18 Contributor: Hailee O’Keefe-MacDonald – Hailee@Inviteeducation.com

 

Franklin First Federal Credit Union launches college planning center with Invite Education

Press release from CUInsight:

GREENFIELD, MA (July 19, 2017) — Franklin First Federal Credit Union (FFFCU) has announced a partnership with Invite Education to offer a free comprehensive, life-cycle college planning website. FFFCU’s College Planning Center, powered by Invite Education, is available to anyone, FFFCU members or non-members, who would like better information, tools, and services to more effectively plan and pay for college. FFFCU is the first Credit Union to partner with Invite Education.

“Planning and paying for higher education can be a daunting task for families. Our hope in partnering with Invite Education is to make this process less stressful by helping families answer critical questions such as ‘How do I save for my children’s education?’ ‘Can my child get in to their dream school?’ and ‘Can we afford it?’” said Franklin First CEO/President Michelle Dwyer. “We look forward to helping all families in the community make the college planning process more positive and rewarding with our new College Planning Center.”

Jeff Bentley, Director of Strategic Partnerships for Invite Education added: “Invite Education is thrilled to have a strategic partner such as Franklin First, which is a visionary thought leader in offering a College Planning Center to clarify the college process for its members.”

The FFFCU/Invite Education College Planning Center is a robust platform with an intuitive design that empowers families to manage the entire college planning process from birth through high school. The website offers:

  • Age-appropriate guidance to empower families with detailed information on preparing, financing, and successfully applying to college
  • Easy-to-understand explanations to help parents evaluate options: savings, scholarships, financial aid, and loans
  • Comprehensive calculators and college and scholarship search engines
  • Resource Center with college planning resources and FFFCU endorsed products/services
  • Calendar that integrates relevant testing dates, college and scholarship deadlines, and family specific events

Those interested can access the FFFCU College Planning Center at https://franklinfirst.inviteeducation.com/. For more information, call Franklin First Federal Credit Union at (413) 774-6700.


About Franklin First Federal Credit Union

Franklin First Federal Credit Union began in 1958 at Franklin County Public Hospital. In the 1980’s there were mergers of four Franklin County credit unions: Franklin County Public Hospital FCU, Franklin County Teachers FCU, Lunt Silversmiths CU, and Greenfield Tap & Die Credit Union. Anyone who lives, works, attends school or worships in Franklin County can join Franklin First. They currently serve over 7,000 members and over 250 Business Group Partners at their branch at 57 Newton Street in Greenfield, Massachusetts.

About Invite Education

Founded in 2012, Invite Education demystifies the process of planning and paying for college by providing a comprehensive suite of information, tools and services for families. Offering an online custom College Planning Center, a weekly podcast called My College Corner, a blog and a book, they partner with organizations to provide this valuable information to their employees, members and customers.

Contacts

Michelle Dwyer
Franklin First Federal Credit Union
(413) 774-6700

Alleviating the Stresses of an Expensive College Tuition

By: Claire Bendig, Recent Graduate of Chapman University

Tuition loans can be a cause of student stress, especially with enough interest accrued to require repayment well into the future. Difficult to evade, only determined hard work will eventually pay them off.

As a college graduate myself, we enter a world of endless responsibilities, unsure of what to do. The debt that is carried over from an undergraduate degree is astronomical. education-2385117_1920According to Student Loan Hero, a blog that guides indebted students, “Americans owe nearly $1.3 trillion in student loan debt, spread out among about 44 million borrowers. In fact, the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.”

There are ways to alleviate the stresses of an expensive tuition. FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid, is a government form that qualifies students for aid based on their particular financial situation.  The problem for many is the tedious application process. It has more than 100 questions, including inquiries about parents’ assets, taxes and net worth.

In March 2016, a group of seven students went to Washington, D.C., to help pass a bill to streamline the FAFSA process. Patrick McDermott was among those who attended. As a student working with college freshmen in dealing with these issues, he says, “The FAFSA process could be made a lot easier by not only implementing the IRS direct transfer as is done now, but by streamlining the amount of information required in determining the monetary awards.” (The IRS Data Retrieval Tool has since faced security issues, causing it to be shut down for now)

Even though the application can be overwhelming for students to fill out, it is well worth the effort to gain access to guaranteed school funding.

Credit unions can help students with financial debt as well (along with other perks like reduced transaction fees, online banking, debit and low-interest rate credit cards). Organizations such as Credit Union Student Choice lay out credit union options for students and mentor them on how loans work and ways to evade interest penalties. When joining a credit union, if the student has a co-signer, they can get a lower interest rate.

In line with their mission to help others, credit union loans will often allow the co-signer to be without obligations if the student has been consistent with payments for the past 12 months. Toni Jaroszewicz, Detroit Branch Manager of Lake Trust Credit Union says, “We offer credit counseling and work with our young folks to help get them on the right track to pay down debt and implement plans that will lead them to financial success.”

Counseling is the educational foundation that is needed to better understand the expectations of the college graduate, and because of the member-status of account holders, credit unions are willing to provide more financial guidance than they are likely to find at banks. My peers and I have graduation fears because so much is unknown. By expanding practical education, we can enter the professional world more confident in our abilities to succeed.

Claire Bendig is a contributor to the Millennial Voice column for CO-OP Financial Services, a financial technology company for 3,500 credit unions and their 60 million members. She is a recent graduate of Chapman University in Orange, California, with an Emphasis in Creative and Technical Writing.

Student Loan miniseries just in time for for your college plans: #MyCollegeCorner

Students and parents are already gearing up for college payment decisions, so we put together a student loan miniseries on our Youtube Channel to help get the knowledge out there. #MyCollegeCorner features weekly updates, so subscribe to stay on track with your plan.  Today’s episode covers subsidized and unsubsidized loans.  Stay tuned for insight on Parent Plus in upcoming episodes.

Gen Z wants to Save $: Lessons from #AmericaSavesWeek

Times are changing! It was an exciting #AmericaSavesWeek Feb 27-March 4 and much was learned. Check your socials for #ASW17 or #ASW2017 for loads of financial wisdom and motivation from a variety of institutions. If you ever wonder if it’s making an impact, remember a new generation “Gen-Z” grew up in the “Financial Crises” era with a different view  of money not seen since the Great Depression, so get ready to roll out even more financial literacy content to support their goals and share prosperity!

A study from the Gild featured on Marcomm.com explains:

“Yet Gen Z were shown to be a generation of savers having grown up post-financial crash, with 25% saying they would rather save for the future than spend money they don’t have and 22% saying they never spend on “unnecessary, frivolous things” because saving is so important. These attitudes were shared with the Silent Generation, with 43% and 25% of respectively.”

The study also notes that this is a generation that grew up with the internet and is accustomed to information being made available quickly on any modern device. It’s a long way from the dial-up modem days!

Feel old yet? THINK AGAIN! Traditional institutions like banks, credit unions, educational non-profits and 529 providers are in position to grow using a combination of new technology and time tested wisdom already present in your culture.  Technology is more socialized with Gen Z to where expectations for simple online tools has grown. They have goals and want to move forward. Will your organization help or hinder this process? Here’s a few ideas:

What is your narrative? Even if you think your organization doesn’t have one, or maybe it’s to “maximize shareholder value” (No small feat), your group’s goals are a piece of the greater story Gen-Z is living through.  Are you helping them get where they want to be? If the answer is a resounding “YES” then stick to it and continue to empower Gen-Z with your traditions adapted up to new technology.  Yes, you can promote financial literacy to a new generation of savvy savers and they want to engage your organization to do so!

Your content can provide both sides of the story: Let’s face it, it’s a noisy environment on social media. There appears to be a storm in every news cycle, and the cycles are happening faster than ever!   The good news is your organization does not need to pick sides on hot media topics (Education, Healthcare, Government are astoundingly media driven at times), it just needs to know both sides of the story.  If you are sticking with a principled narrative, you help people guide themselves through any situation using your concepts and ideas. Gen Z is very aware that a single story may be interpreted in many different ways, so instead of pushing an agenda, keep it simple and show both sides of the story while promoting honest dialogue.  Keep your comments section open to allow different views to participate and communicate perspective on your content.

Help with decision making first: There’s a lot of options! We’ve learned this first hand at Invite Education with software covering the financial variables related to college attendance. With over 4,000 institutions of higher learning plus a huge scholarship database, the best thing we can do is provide transparency and financial literacy fundamentals to help families make smart decisions.  We realize there is no perfect “one way” for everyone, so we take a “Consumer Reports” approach to the question of college choice.  This way anyone can use the resources and find what they need.  Just let people make their own personal decisions with your organization’s assistance.  This is far removed from the days of pushing product first on radio or tv.  It’s about targeting the goals of your audience first and providing value with products/services supporting those goals featured second.  Gen-Z is ready to move their life forward, are you ready to help?

Learn more about Invite Education; Subscribe to the Youtube Page for great interviews, college planning advice and more.

Why Co-signing a Loan is the Best Way to Help Your Kids Borrow for College

I know, you love your child and want the best college for them.  They worked so hard but are a little – or a lot – short of affording their dream school.  Don’t fall into the parent trap of borrowing heavily for college at the expense of your retirement.  You can help them without hurting yourself.  Here’s how to find the middle ground.

Start by framing the discussion like this: college loans should be the last resort, not the first option.  First, look to savings to reduce future debt.  Even if you start late in high school, it’s ok because bills will continue to arrive four or more years down the road. Saving a dollar today beats borrowing one tomorrow. Here’s an article on college affordability and a podcast.

Next, look for free money: gifts from relatives, grants and scholarships that do not have to be repaid.  Here’s an overview of need vs. merit based aid, and a drill-down on grants.

Finally, determine if you or the student can contribute earnings while the student is in-school racking up those bills.   When savings plus free money plus current income exceeds the cost, no loans are necessary.   Be sure to account for all four (or more) years the student will be a college student, if there is a gap between expected cost and available resources, then it’s time to consider loans.  For most students, the Federal Loan program is by far the best option when you consider the interest rate and repayment terms.  One problem: the amount that can be borrowed is capped.

Let’s assume that the student takes a government loan but a gap still remains between the cost of college and the sources of money. Now all eyes turn to you (or perhaps grandparents or other relatives) for help.

The BEST ADVICE:

  • Co-sign a loan and make sure it has a co-signer release. Many private loans now have a feature to permit you to be dropped from the loan once your child establishes their own good credit.   With this type of college borrowing, you effectively lend your established credit profile to your child so they can be approved for a loan at a time they would not qualify on their own.   Once a good repayment record on the loan is established, the student should contact the loan provider to release you, the co-signer, from future obligations to pay.  Co-signer release is a terrific feature because it permits you to help your child borrow when they need your help. And for you to be released from that obligation when they get on their financial feet.

If there’s no way around it and you have to be the designated borrower, you should:

  1. Shop around. Many parents with good credit can receive substantially lower interest rates on private loans from banks, finance companies or state agencies than the Federal PLUS program.
  2. Be VERY wary of the Federal PLUS Loan. Parents with marginal or bad credit may be eligible for a Federal PLUS loan, but be wary.  The credit analysis used to approve a PLUS loan is minimal and the amount that can be borrowed is very high (the full cost of attendance).  Sounds good?  It’s not.  It is a toxic stew. The government regularly makes large loans to people who will be unable to make the payments.  This is a ticking time bomb waiting to explode.   Also, some parents falsely surmise that they will transfer their PLUS loan to the student in the future.  That is not possible under the terms of the PLUS loan. It is a Parent loan, not a student loan.
  3. NOT borrow from your retirement accounts to pay for your child’s college. It sure sounds good to “repay yourself” the interest that accrues on a loan rather than paying a bank, but it is a terrible idea. Why?  Every dollar you withdraw from your retirement account is one less that can earn interest, dividends or appreciate to grow your retirement savings – and at a time when your retirement is fast approaching.  Just as young families are instructed to start saving early to benefit from compounding, older savers should avoid touching the nest egg because you (we) are running out of time to grow the account. This is no time to stretch.

If you’re a data hound and seek some data about parent (and grandparent) borrowing, check out the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s recently released “Snapshot of Older Consumers and Student Loan Debt.”

Like many data analysis, this one can be used to support both sides of an argument.   Here, (a) older (age 60+) borrowers are under stress and (b) older borrowers are doing ok.     The CFPB report compares the 10 year period 2005-2015.  The data in parenthesis is 2005 data as cited in the report:

Older borrowers are under stress:

  • Consumers age 60+ is fastest growing segment of the student loan market
    • They owe $66.7 billion
    • There are 2.8 million older borrowers, (up from 700,000)
    • They owe on average $23,500, (up from $12,100)
  • Delinquencies are up from 7.4% (2005) to 12.5% (2015)
    • 37% of borrowers over 64 are in default
    • 40,000 have Social Security benefits offset (8,700 in 2005)

Older borrowers are doing ok:

  • 73% is borrowed for children or grandchildren – indicating a choice to help rather than being burdened by their own debt.
  • Fewer than 31% of older borrowers owed federal loans (867,000 of 2.8 million)
    • Fewer than 7.5% held PLUS Loans (210,000 holders)
  • Of 2.8 million borrowers, only 1,100 lodged loan complaints with the CFPB

What does this all mean?

To me, it’s clear.

  1. Parents should establish a college savings program for their family that is appropriate for their financial situation.
  2. Students should seek financial aid by filing the required forms.
  3. Parents and students should realistically assess how much current income each can contribute to defray costs while the student is in school.
  4. Students should be primarily responsible for taking loans for college. The federal loan program is the best solution for most of them.
  5. If parents are enlisted to help their students with loans, they should contribute by co-signing a loan with a co-signer release.
  6. If parents need to be the sole obligor to borrower for their child’s education, they should shop around, be wary of the federal PLUS program and not borrow from their retirement account.

I can’t help but think of the airline oxygen mask analogy.   There is a reason we’re instructed to put on our oxygen mask before taking care of a child.   Incapacitated parents are of no help to kids.  The same is true for parent borrowing for college.  If you feel compelled to help borrower for a child or grandchild’s education, be sure not to imperil your future well-being.  Co-signing a loan helps the next generation achieve their dream of a college education without imperiling your dream of comfortable twilight years.

Check out Invite Education #MyCollegeCorner on YouTube

Making sense of complex college funding questions just got easier!

Check out the Invite Education YouTube channel for #MyCollegeCorner videos featuring answers to your most common questions, and insight on how best to proceed.

The Free Money Mini-Series begins this week bringing light to the subject of grants and scholarships, your favorite money from the financial aid office since it does not need to be paid back like a loan.   Like, Share and Subscribe!

 

Highlights from the RI Jump$tart Financial Capability Conference: #FinLitRI on Twitter

Highlights from theRI Jump$tart Financial Capability Conference!

Financial literacy is modernizing with new tools to deliver empowering knowledge helping people make smart financial decisions. It’s grown to include   and  and more as featured throughout the conference. Invite Education supports these initiatives, with Jeff Bentley in attendance, providing copies of the new book “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”:

 

‘Tis the season for College Savings: 3 Painless Holiday Tips

The year-end affords the opportunity to reflect and optimistically plan ahead. Use these three holiday hints to get started and by this time next year, you’ll be proud of your accomplishments. (…and don’t forget to clue in grandparents and other relatives to get a bigger bang for your buck!):

  • Check the couch for loose change – 2017 style:   I was riding the elevator with a woman who was reading Plan and Finance Your Family’s College Dreams and she offered one of the best tips I’ve heard:
    couch-money
    …find more than loose change in your checking account

    Check the automatic payments connected to your checking account and cancel those you don’t regularly use or need.   She found more than $75 per month – loose change in the couch, 2017 style.  Next year, her re-allocated spending will fill up a 529 college savings plan with nearly $1,000. It’s repurposed “found money” that has no impact on her current spending or life style. Brilliant. How much can you find?

  • Make the Gift of College a Holiday Present: 2016 was a breakthrough year for innovation to make savings in 529 Plans easier. According to the College Savings Foundation, 90% of parents said that online and other gifting options would make college savings easier – and their holiday wish has been fulfilled. These innovations come in many variations so finding options that work well for your family should be easy. The College Savings Foundation outlines the various opportunities, which include:
    • Online gifting and/or gift certificates and coupons that can be printed and presented as gifts – with the gifted amount automatically deposited into a 529 account.
    • Emailed invitations offering gift givers access to make a gift directly into a 529 account.
    • Customized web pages with family or beneficiary (student) specific information.
    • GiftofCollege cards available at Toys’R’Us and Babies’R”Us or from some employers allows gifts to be made into any 529 Plan offered in the country.
  • Use Credit Card “Cash-Back” Rewards to Fill up 529 Plans. Find a credit card linked directly to 529 Plans or be disciplined about depositing Cash Back Rewards from other cards into a college savings account. The great things about these programs is that they allow you to fill your 529 coffers as you go through your normal day: no behavioral changes are necessary. Just be sure to not roll-up big credit card bills that you can’t pay in full each month to avoid paying big interest that will easily wipe-out the amount you can save.
    • Credit Cards linked to College Savings. There are several credit cards that permit users to accumulate cash back rewards to be deposited into 529 account. Some of these programs include:
    • CollegeCounts 529 Rewards Visa Card offers 1.529% back for those with a 529 Account offered by Union Bank in Alabama’s 529 Program and the Illinois Bright Horizons.
    • Fidelity Rewards Visa Signature Card offers 2% cash back to certain Fidelity accounts including Fidelity managed 529 Plans.
    • The Upromise MasterCard offers a range of cash-back benefits depending on the products purchased and the merchant from which they were purchased.
    • Other Cash Back Cards. Even if your credit card is not directly linked to a 529 Plan, you could easily take some or all of those cash rewards and deposit them into a 529 Plan. Every bit helps!
    • Learn more: “Using a credit card to save for college” from New York Times Money Adviser.

Each of these will allow you to increase savings without changing any of your current spending or giving habits. Find one or more that work well for your family. Recruit grandparents, relatives and friends to help and you’ll accumulate a nice nest egg that will no doubt reduce the amount that might need to be borrowed for college later. A dollar saved today is better than one borrowed tomorrow!

Send your success stories and other tips to info@Inviteeducation.com as you plan, save and succeed in 2017.

Happy Holidays!

John Hupalo is the Founder of Invite Education and co-author of the recently released book: Plan and Finance Your Family’s College Dreams: A Parent’s Step-by-Step Guide from Pre-K to Senior Year

The Harvard Coop features “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”

12/6/16 UPDATE**

Thanks so much to the Harvard Coop for hosting the event!

 

 

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Join authors John Hupalo and Peter Mazareas at the Harvard Coop for discussion and signing of the new book “Plan and Finance your Family’s College Dreams”, available now.

Topics include:

  • Grade and age appropriate guidance for parents with newborns through 12th grade Admissions and financial aid tips
  • Learning about 529 plans for college savings
  • Important deadlines that can’t be missed
  • Audience questions on planning and paying for college

Date: Tuesday December 6, 2016 @ 7:00 pm

Location: Harvard Coop. 1400 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge, MA 02238

Contact: 617-499-2000 www.thecoop.com